A Handy Reference to the Life, Thought and Writings of C.S. Lewis

A-Z I was in the fourth or fifth grade when the world of Narnia was first introduced to me. My teacher began to read the chronicles to the class and I was mesmerized. She would close out each chapter and I ached to know what would happen next. Something happened in me that year and I found myself immersed in the next book of the series. I had become a C. S. Lewis fan. Years later in College I would be introduced to his other works  such as The Four Loves, God in the Dock and Mere Christianity. I can’t explain what it is about Lewis’ life and writing that I like so much, other than they have helped me make sense of the world.  You can imagine my delight when I found out that Colin Duriez produced an encyclopedia of Lewis’ life, thought and writings.

The A-Z of C S Lewis: A Complete Guide to His Life, Thoughts and Writings is without a doubt an accessible treasure chest of information about C.S. Lewis and his writing. I’ve enjoyed looking through this book and remembering key characters and passages I had almost forgotten and then finding some new ones from works I haven’t read yet (but will soon!).  It has become a second awakening for me in regards to Lewis and his writings; a reminder that I have not exhausted the joy that his reading brings to me. I think it’s a fantastic book and a great addition to any library, especially to those who would consider themselves a fan. I can’t recommend it enough.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Litfuse as part of their Blog Tour. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

As One Devil to Another by Richard Platt (A Review)

I read As One Devil to Another last week and was blown away at the insight into human nature the book provided.  The Author, Richard Platt, writes in the same style as C. S. Lewis in his book, The Screwtape Letters. The book chronicles a series of fictional letters exchanged between two demons on the nature of deceiving and tempting the human to which one is assigned.

As One Devil to Another is well written for it’s genre and reads faster than one might suspect for a book full of “letters.” There are a few points where the author seems to press his view a bit more than the writing style intends to hold, but for the most part the insight into the human heart is spot on and even creepy.

I really liked this book and highly recommend it to anyone who is a fan of C. S. Lewis’ The Screw Tape Letters. As One Devil to Another is also a great read for pastors, teachers, etc. who are looking for a reminder or need a refresher on just how easily we are deceived. I give it 5 Stars.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received a copy of this book free from Tyndale House Publishers as part of their Tyndale Blog Network. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Hands Down the Best Fiction Book I have read in a long time… Instant Classic!

The Charlatan’s Boy by Jonathan Rogers is by far the best fiction book I have read in a long time!  The book is about a the exploits of a young orphan named Grady and his charlatan father figure Floyd.   The story is told through Grady’s eyes as he travels the Cornwald frontier wandering from village to village with Floyd playing hoaxes and tricking people out of their money.

Grady is ugly, there is no doubt about it.  Floyd puts Grady’s ugliness to work for them as they travel the country side having Grady perform as a real live wild feechie, the world’s ugliest boy, and the assistant to a phrenologist.  Grady is filled with inner turmoil as he wonders about who he really is and where he came from.  He also struggles with the lies and scams that have come to define his life and set him apart from regular village folks who work hard to earn an honest days wage.  Then just as Grady’s thoughts are colliding Floyd sets about on a new scheme to revive the Great Feechie Scare.

I don’t want to let the cat out of the bag on this one, because it is a well written book and you deserve a chance to read it on your own.  In my opinion it has all the markings of a classic.  It is definitely the best fiction book I have read in a long time and the best fiction book I have ever read by a living author.  If you enjoy a good story every now and then, you will love this book.  The retail price of The Charlatan’s Boy: A Novel is $13.99 (Paperback), and is available around the web in places like Amazon.com for $11.19. I gave it five stars and would give it more if I could.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received a copy of this book free from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group as part of their Blogging for Books Program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

The Chasm By Randy Alcorn (a Review)

I really enjoyed reading The Chasm: A Journey to the Edge of Lifeby Randy Alcorn!  The book is a short allegory somewhat reminiscent of C. S. Lewis’ The Great Divorce and John Bunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress .

The story has all the markings of a great book.  Alcorn takes the reader through a plane where the invisible becomes visible and emptiness of vain pursuits are seen before the journey’s end.  The main character Nick Seagrave  wanders a barren world between two greater worlds.  Below lies the a sea of wicked creatures bent on destruction and feasting on the flesh and misery of all those who reject the overtures of kindness from the king of a place called Charis.  Above there are mighty warriors of light thirsty only for the honor of their great and mighty king. Between these two worlds men travel many paths that all eventually lead to a great chasm, but only one road leads to the chasm in a way that provides hope.

I was greatly fascinated and encouraged by the Chasm.  I really like allegory for all that can be said in the matter of a few paragraphs.  Alcorn’s commentary on life, creation, fall, redemption and heaven are amazing.  His commentary on the allure and repulsion of sin is spot on.

The Chasm is a very powerful and engaging allegory.  I highly recommend it to anyone interested in allegory.  It also makes a great gift book.  The retail price of The Chasm is $14.99 (Hardcover), and is available around the web in places like Amazon.com for $10.11. I gave it five stars.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received a copy of this book free from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group as part of their Blogging for Books Program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”