The Color of Justice (REVIEW)

the color of justiceThe Color of Justice is an engaging courtroom drama centered on the issue of racial reconciliation. In 1964 a white girl is murdered and a young black man is fingered for the crime despite a lack of evidence. Cooper Lindsey an aspiring lawyer with roots in the small town of Justice, Mississippi steps in to make sure the defendant gets a fair shake. The book is reminiscent of To Kill a Mockingbird , even to the point that the author references Mobile and Montgomery with some frequency. The twist comes when another lawyer enters town in 2014 to answer the questions left by the case in 1964 and to defend a young white man accused of killing a young black man.

The Color of Justice speaks well to the theme of racial reconciliation, repentance and forgiveness. The author helps the reader seemingly explore the issues from both a black and white perspective. Early on the main character maintains that he is not racist, but when confronted with difficult circumstances he has to really examine his motives and thoughts. The author does a great job of illustrating the reality of racism in a 1964 Mississippi town without fully engaging in racist rhetoric. He lays down enough hints and interjections to get the message across without ever actually penning derogatory terms.

Over all I thought this was a great book. The author kept the lines of tension tight which always makes for a great read and the inability to put the book down. I know I lost an hour of sleep just so I could muddle through to the end of the book and not have to wait till later. I got my copy from amazon.com who has it on sale right now for $13.49 in paperback.

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Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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“Be The People,” by Carol M. Swain (A Review)

To be sure, Be the People by Carol M. Swain is a political book. Ms. Swain writes from a solidly conservative and solidly Christian view point.  My interest was piqued when I learned a bit about Ms. Swain’s background from her website, Carolmswain.com. She has experienced childhood poverty, being a high school drop-out, and a teenage mother, yet found a way to overcome her obstacles and writes now as a Vanderbilt University Law Professor and accomplished writer.

The book is fascinating in its own right. Swain does a fantastic job of fleshing out the positions held by conservatives with Christian values.  She does a great job providing the facts while maintaining a journalistic edge making the book both easy to read and informative.

Generally speaking both conservatives and liberals overstate and oversimplify issues.  I was glad to see in that in this book Swain went through great rigors to avoid oversimplifying and overstating.  I highly recommend this book to anyone looking to gain insight into the political system and reasoning from the conservative side of the issues.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson as part of the BookSneeze program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. Some of the links in the post above are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will add value to my readers. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”